12 Fresh Foods You Should Never Store Together

Your kitchen is bursting with fruits and veggies, but days later, they're all wilted. Use these storage rules to keep foods fresher longer.

1 / 12

01_cucumber_fresh_foods_never_store_togetheristock/balefire9

Cucumbers stand alone

Many fruits, such as tomatoes, bananas, and melons, produce ethylene gas, a ripening agent that speeds up spoilage. Cucumbers are super sensitive to this ethylene gas, so they need their own place or they'll spoil faster. They're actually more suited to hanging out on the counter than in the crisper drawer with off-gassing fruits, but if you want cold cucumbers, you can store them for a few days in the fridge (away from fruits). (These superfoods should always be in your kitchen.)

2 / 12

02_herbs_fresh_foods_never_store_togetheristock/agisilaouspyrouphotography

Treat herbs like fresh flowers

If you're trying to cut back on salt or just add more flavour to your food, fresh herbs fit the bill (plus, they offer tons of health benefits), but don't just toss them in the fridge. "Store fresh herbs just as you would fresh cut flowers," says Dana Tomlin, Fresh Manager at Wheatsville Food Co-op in Austin, Texas. First, make sure the leaves are completely dry. Next, snip off the ends and place the herbs, stem down in a cup or mason jar with water. Most herbs do well when stored this way in the fridge. Basil, however, likes to hang out at room temperature. You'll still want to place it in a jar with water though. When the water gets yucky, drain and add fresh water. Most herbs stored this way are good for up to two weeks.

3 / 12

03_pumpkin_fresh_foods_never_store_together_istock/fotokris

Squash and pumpkins don't go with apples and pears

Squash and pumpkins are well known for having a long shelf life but apples, another fall favourite (along with pears and other ripening fruit) shouldn't be stored with them. According to Oregon State University Extension Service, it will cause the squash to yellow and go bad. Squash and pumpkins keep well at temps between 10 and 12 degrees Celsius, which is cooler than room temperature but not as chilly as the fridge. Larger pumpkins and larger squash will last up to six months, but keep an eye on the smaller ones, as they usually last about three months.